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to develop very in depth content, but if they don't have a venue, they do not have a way to show us, then this work is only staying here inside and nobody knows the brilliance and the amazing work that the students are doing. >> the term has changed over time from a very basic who has a computer and who doesn't have a computer to now who has access to the internet, especially high speed internet, as well as the skills and the knowledge to use those tools effectively. . >> the city is charged with coming up with digital inclusion. the department of telecommunications put together a 15 member san francisco tech connect task force. we want the digital inclusion program to make sure we address the needs of underserved vulnerable communities, not communities that are already very tech savvy. we are here to provide a, b and c to the seniors. a stands for access. b stands for basic skills and c stands for content. and unless we have all three, the monolingual chinese seniors are never going to be able to use the computer or the internet. >> a lot of the barrier is knowledge. people don't k
is the excessive beer and wine sales as opposed to -- beyond 15%. not the other uses such as permitted uses such as takeout food and food served on the premises and the fountain. >> the restaurant portion does appear to be operating within the parameters set by the commission in 2007. the grocery store is not. the wine sales has exceeded the area that is permitted and the grocery part, -- the 2007 action was in part to preserve that grocery store. if we do this and this we can still sell the groceries. but they didn't. they went on and put in the restaurant and the wine sales but they did not really develop the grocery portion. the other concern is the facade and i realize that a lot of people like the facade the way it is now however the building is a historic resource and has been determined to be that by the department. and to change the facade in the way they have really takes away the historic character of that building. it had a very distinctive facade of its period and the improvements that they made, granted they were extensive and expensive went in the opposite direction of what th
of shipping containers. it was important for us that we made this project for the place, of the place. what i mean by that is participants would also used repurchased materials. >> we will be speaking to one of the artists that you selected. what excited you about his idea? >> have many things. first of all, i am a fan of his architecture. because of that creativity, i knew that he could come up with something unique. i love the fact that he was specifically addressing the landscape around here, and it was also about the human interaction with this place. >> what are your expectations with the people coming to presidio habitat? >> we really hope people will come with their family, dogs, and come back a number of times the works will change over the year. the feedback we are getting is you cannot do all of them on one visit. it is really better to come back and have different experiences. >> thank you. i am with mark jensen of jensen architect. he was one of the architects to be chosen to do the presidio habitat. when you heard about this project, what inspired you about that call? >> our insp
glass on mission street in san francisco with mr. ken paige. ken paige has generously invited us into his glass shop and gallery. and the paige glass goes back a long, long time, right? to preearthquake, whichever earthquake -- >> all of them. they're all good. >> when did paige glass start? >> the big one, 1906. >> this happened afs in your family, was paige glass back then? >> well, the 1906 was a very important year, of course, for san francisco, needless to say. the bad news was the death and destruction, city in flames. the good news for my grandfather was even though he was living, at that point, in a tent out in golden gate park, you know, one of a whole lot of people. the good news, he was a young glazer, and every window in the city was broken. >> a holy grail of glazing. >> [laughter.] >> so at that point, shortly after the tremors sopped, he said wait a minute, i've got this idea. so paige glass really started in 1906, with that quake. >> wow. >> and he was so busy, he didn't really form an actual company-company, a registered company till 1910. i think that was the fi
specifically a third fast-food restaurant in the center but it was only to be used as a bakery. >> and why does chipolte fit into the use as a fast-food restaurant such as pizza hut did? is it the difference in the type of food? what other types of restaurants can go in? >> it is narrowly drawn and that only applies to the large fast food. the restaurant they were referring to may not have been a large fast food. only this par space. >> ok. >> i would certainly think that miss jones as representatives of lakeshore plaza has listened well to the comments of the various neighborhood organizations and i and here stand them. in defense of the plaza or in defense of business in general, might i say in 21 years the concept of individual restaurants verses fast food has greatly changed. all individual russia wants in -- restaurants in areas that are not heavily trafficked have a very difficult time to survive. this is a fast-food restaurant which is not a derogatory term, by the way. those of the ones that survive in these locations. also in 1989, the process by which this4hñ departm
the communications sent to us since the last regular meeting. if you have any issues or points you would like to raise or ed regarding the advanced calendar, if you could also note those. the commissioners have also received the two indicated staff reports. >> i have some questions. first of all, i want to thank you for putting on the budget hearings well in advance. we usually wait until the last moment and scramble around. i do want some clarification. not the budget hearing, but under january 20, that is a thursday. but we are adopting -- is this a regular -- are we making this a regular meeting on january 20? >> we have several ceqa reviews coming up. as you know, the planning commission meets on thursdays. there will be several instances where we will be asking you if you will consider having a regular meeting or a special meeting of the commission the same day as the planning commission so that if they adopt the findings the commission can do it the same day. >> i see. going back to the schedule budget hearing -- january 13, i believe, is the regular meeting day. no -- it's a thursday.
, when mr. dennis normandy was on this commission. some of us from the community put a lot of effort to see that we would go to a better place. but the actions led to our just focusing on the clean water, which we are doing now. and soon we will be addressing the waste water, which will impact san francisco in a big way. the reason i am here is to point out to the commissioners, in view of what has happened at san bruno, with the infrastructure there, how when we tear up our roads, how when we expose our utilities -- to look at our utilities in a realistic manner. now, this may seem to be very easy, but it is very difficult. so i am calling upon the engineers to work on this. i know we cannot expose all this information because of 9/11, but one of the reasons i am speaking to you is that from the inception, before we begin this wastewater project, we do it in the right way. thank you very much. president crowley: thank you. next speaker, please. >> good afternoon, commissioners, and welcome back. one of the reasons i came today is that i had heard from different people in my communit
have to be thoughtful about that. it is somewhat unfair of us to say there is no capacity on site for your kid, and there is no capacity and our child development for your kids, so therefore, we are quick to charge you for something that you have been getting for free. so if we're going to ask people to pay, what we need to do is ask it places said that where there is capacity on site, we could say to people, ok, you're going to have to pay for it. so i really would just urge us to be thoughtful about that, it is after school is one of those things that is absolutely essential. you cannot expect a six-year old to get home on the muni by themselves. anyway, so that is my strongest reaction that i have. i think, also, i am open to not grandfathering stops, and i think we have to draw the line somewhere. i just think we have to give notice about this year, you will have it. next year, you will not. as commissioner wynns said, it may be so draconian that i would not vote for it. we cannot be cavalier about that. >> i am going to direct staff to do an analysis on these. as much as i li
million copies around the world. his latest is a look at how each one of us can leave a lasting legacy will be on our time at birth. the new text is called "outlive your life." also, a special performance from john mellencamp. it is in stores this week. author and preacher max lucado and a special performance from john mellencamp. >> his name is james and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide is proud to join tavis a. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- tavis: max lucado is a renowned preacher who sit -- preaches in san antonio. he is a best-selling author whose books have sold more than a 55 million copies around the world. his latest text is called "outlive your life: if you were made to make a difference." thank you for join
. it goes, boom. it's important to shut this off. we use it for cooking, eating and hot water. there were 40,000 people that called pg and e about their gas. that means they call turned off their gas? did they need to do that? when do you have to? when there is a problem. how long did you think it takes pg and e to get out and turn it back on? 45,000 people. days weeks, may be a month. who has seen this in the streets. a lot of muck is in there is it's full of dirt and weeds you turn it to the right to tighten it and left to loosen it. your home work you have to look at your house, pop open the lid, look in there see what's going on in there it's not nice and clean like this. who has seen this around their house? everybody. each meter has a shut off. you want to find out where your gas meter is. you can keep track of your usage but you will know how to shut it off. here's the shut off. i have some tools up here, you can look at these. any hardware store has these. they fit on this and it allows you to turn off the gas. when we talk about the wheels it's these on top. if you have a broken pip
. if we are in the neighborhood schools, it can save us the energy for the school bus coming so much more. it benefits the san francisco citizenship. we do not need to pay more tax to support the school bus. i had personal issues effective in march and april. my eldest son got accepted into a school. the time to drop him off, my youngest son has to show up at the other school, which is far away. many times, this happens to parents in the school district. we have to save more money in our personal budget so we can let our children go on for higher learning. being parents, we are upset with that. commissioner wynns: we have five minutes left. >> my name is randy wong. i represent an elementary school bilingual program. after fourth grade, our parents have an -- our students have no more bilingual tests. most of our kids decide to change middle schools. i represent the parents' petition. we are against our kids go into a middle school without an immersion program or bilingual program. thank you. >> good evening. i wanted to start by thanking the district for the good faith with which they ha
not changed. i want to keep emphasizing that. this is technology from decades of use. these are no some -- not some newfangled type of thing. the box transmits the data at 4 bits per day, so it is not a constant stream of data. it is just four times per day. it can be shut off remotely. they're pretty well protected so they cannot be tampered with without physically going to remove the box, and, that means we have, again, those that are manually read, they can always check those. the data collection units, that receives the meter reading frequency channel, puc, at 77 places across the city, and they are pretty innocuous looking, but they are scattered around the city. most of them are run on solar power, with a few on ac current because they are in areas where there is not access to enough sunlight to make it working very well. this one is actually on the roof on some offices. the project deployment schedule, we have been in the phase where we have been deploying about 300 to 400 meters per week. this will extend it to about 8000 units. we will then go into work in phase one. again, wil
closer to that girl i dreamed up. i used lots of them, 20 products a day, makeup, skin creams, an enormous cloud of aqua net hair spray. this is the back in the days of big hair and shoulder pads and bright makeup. i looked up all these products as a teen, 20 products a day, i was surprised to discover, i had been with exposing myself to 200 products a day before i got on the school bus. what is in this stuff that we put on our bodies, put in our hair on a daily basis. that is what we have been working on and looking at for about the passed 5 years. these are the groups involved in the campaign for safe products. most poplar brands of all kinds of products, deodor rants, makeups, even baby shampoos contain chemicals that are toxic that get into our system. most of these chemicals, um, come from oil by-products, petroleum. this is true of the high end brands like cliniq ue. we know they are toxic, animal studies show they lead to certain health effects. it is okay because there is just a little bit of toxic chemical and you can't prove it causes harm. so of course, as we pointe
of the avenue. this moves us into the stock that would provide greater access for the residents of the park and greater safety for all of the user's including san francisco state. this would create a very important linkage that is missing in our transportation system in this side of the city. there are other advantages not only providing for stops that you can get off the new system but also the opportunities to create a landscaped front door to the city right here on 19th avenue. we also will be providing a zero to low emissions shuttle bus that will provide access from this unique and the bus stops that we are providing at the northern edge directly to the daily city parks station. this connects directly to the part. this is a very important linkage. in the interim, we will be using the same shuttle best -- shuttle bus. as was mentioned, this is a long-term project which took approximately 20 years to complete but we know the estimates that we have given you are actually conservative ones. we see this as an opportunity to create a place that is truly unique. the neighborhood future is a r
these things may be necessary for us now, as we go into the future. where are we headed and where are the answers? i have to tell you that about a year ago i was trying to figure out, 8-28. i was trying to figure out what was going on. what i was supposed to do, what i was supposed to talk about and people ask me all the time. where do we go from here? where is the guy? where is the president and where is the-- the more i went down the road of trying to figure things out, the more i realized that the answer isn't in washington, it's not in politics, it's in here. we have to fundamentally change ourselves. so, as i'm looking to the touch future, the thing i did a year ago, i went back to the beginning. i went to this guy. the first real revolutionary, moses and the ten commandments. so, we're going to have a discussion with people who know about these, these guys. with us, dr. alveda king, the director of african-american outreach for priests for life, she is the niece of dr. martin luther king, jr., the author of "who we are in christ jesus" and also stood with me on 8-28 on the s
-- again, 3/16. this used to be called -- again, the old term was crystal. if you talk to somebody my age, they would say -- because 3/16 was always poured glass and always crystal. they didn't do a twin ground. so it is the same thing as the quarter inch. and you still see it around because they put it in where they're trying to lighten a way. you want to put it in a window so it's not so heavy on a double-hung. it's a good product, but again, you know. you know, it's like window glass, you just have to hit it just a little harder. plate glass, same way. you know, this is what essentially was in i-magnum. this is what's in the mills building. this is what's in the rust building. this is what's in th in the hurt building. there's putty around them. they're going to shift. the wood kind of comes and goes. so it takes quite a bit to break a piece of plate because -- i mean you can -- this will take quite a bit of vertical weight but if it gets bound or whatever, you know, if you just get it in the wrong spot, that's what happens. >> we're seeing some major high rises going up near the bay b
today to explain to us a little bit more about how the pipeline system works, with the infrastructure challenges and how people can get more materials their area from the government, we appreciate your information. guest: thank you, susan. host: we're going to close out today by telling you what's coming up next on c-span. you're going to join in progress the family research council on their annual meeting. it's called the 2010 values voter summit. it's taking place at the regency ballroom here in washington, d.c. it started at 8:45 this morning, so they're underway. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] . our strength and have the vision for what works in our country. think about a culture that does not have the values, the restraint of being accountable to god. we see it all over the world. where the economy works with corruption and work politicians are corrupt. the cost of the people that have no values and morals. then you need a bigger government to control a violent and disruptive people. there is a corr
to another edition of the road to recovery. today we'll be talking about homelessness and substance use disorder treatment. joining us in our panel today are dr. h. westley clark, director, center for substance abuse treatment, substance abuse and mental health services administration, u.s. department of health and human services, rockville, maryland. richard cho, director of innovations and research, corporation for supportive housing, new haven, connecticut. robert kershaw, business owner and outreach worker, oxford house, incorporated, silver spring, maryland. dr. jesse b. milby, director, medical psychology, substance abuse and homeless research program, department of psychology, university of alabama at birmingham, birmingham, alabama. dr. clark, when is a person categorized as homeless? well, the most important thing is to recognize that when a person lacks a permanent, fixed residence, they meet the category of homeless. now, there are a number of temporary arrangements that people have; for instance, it's estimated that roughly 1.6 million people are living in transitional or sh
're not able to use their voice, possibly because of their past, i step in and show them, model for them a behavior to help them for the next times they have a kind of practice in the community. if we're in a situation where a doctor, you know, say, is unwilling to do a certain test or they find that it's not necessary, a case manager will step in and provide the three best reasons why they should go ahead and go ahead do the test, because otherwise, in most situations, a client might just walk away and say, ok, well, never mind. but we want them to be able to walk into the community and say, i need x, y, and z and be able to get x, y, and z. we also provide evidence-based practices. the clinical services that we provide are founded in research. there's a strong theory behind them. and we try to train all of our staff so that they're really familiar with the evidence-based practices, the state-of-the-art practices that we're using today. we are fortunate enough to partner with dartmouth college, their prc institute, to work with a research fund that we have called west, west program. and
have the winner in studio b apparently cooking us something here. i'll have to find out what it is and who the winner is. also on fridays, aleen gabey from the maryland spca comes in and brings an adorable pet up for adoption. we'll meet uda, 6 years old, needs a home. sweet as can be and very shy. first things first as you can see, i'm by myself. jamie's not here. he is on the go this morning because once again, he's somewhere in the state of maryland. this time he went west to visit the mountains of maryland. hey, jamie. >> reporter: welcome to cumberland! here we are. three, four ♪ [music] ♪ we'll play it for you on maine street here in beautiful cumberland. main street of the magic kingdom except for the? >> the mouse. >> look at this. cover lady boss singing hello. >> describe allegheny county. >> 60,000 acres of public land and this beautiful town right in the middle of it. >> reporter: we're going to show you cumberland and music from the shop owners here. look at the mountains. the leaves start to change right up there on the hill. we're on the mountain side of ma
opportunities to celebrate local artists, to celebrate and used part as a way of educating the community not only about art, but about how the puc works in its role in the community. we did not see health as a criteria for component of other community benefit programs, but we see what puc is doing as a way of having opportunities to improve health in the community, not just with the mitigation of orders and traffic congestion and other things that result from development, but by the maintenance of open space and parks and recreation areas so that people can develop healthy recreation lifestyles and see puc as a partner in developing positive outcomes. in the area of education, i will not go into detail, but there are so many ways to augment what is happening in the public school district and teach young people about the ways that water, power, and wastewater services are delivered that will enhance their understanding of physics, knowledge, math, so we are hopeful that education will be a very important part of the community benefits policy that we propose you develop. land use -- we hav
and destroyed dozens of homes. >> terry mcsweeney joins us now from san bruno. nerves rattled again. >> yes. and certainly adds to the uncertainty in this neighborhood. you can see fire trucks, police, pg&e, cleanup crews. the list goes on. a lot of flashing lights. you see the american red cross over there as well. no wonder people out here are on edge. a new report may give them more reason to be that way. >> a day of school for two girls. the school was being evacuated. no one said why. >> i talked to them and they told me there was the smell of gas. >> in the community where the school was evacuated for the same reason yesterday, people are on edge. that's why joe lynch is making sure he stays cool as possible. >> i'm just more concerned about them not getting freaked out again because we did see the explosion and it's had quite an effect on them. i'm just trying to remain as calm as possible with them and reassure them. >> the crestmore children were evacuated to the intermediate school. he couldn't believe it when he heard the announcement her school was coming his way because of the
to find the smartest and best price to use that have the least impact on the environment. we've been a very big supporter of the trust republic land and the nature conservancy as well. and we've done all this without sacrificing the care and comfort that's so important to all our customers. and now we incorporate more than 100 ecofriendly business practices every day at every one of our hotels. and over time, that's added up to a very big effort. and we like to talk about the impact that it's had, and the way we talk about it has been how many olympic swimming pool sizes of water have we saved, or how many thousands of houses that we could have lit up with the energy that we saved. so we decided that maybe we need to be a little bit more scientific about that and maybe have somebody come from the outside and actually validate our claims of what we have been doing. so a couple years ago, we started doing some research, and we now have come to an organization called green seal that is in the business of validating and finding the best practices for ecological companies like ourselves.
, is the u.s. still making any use of military bases and oman as in the past? >> i think we have military cooperation with oman, as we do with many countries, but i will defer the specifics to the pentagon. >> do you have any comment on the new japanese foreign minister? will the secretary have a bilateral meeting with him next week? >> we appreciated his many contributions to the u.s.-japan alliance and his role as foreign minister and we look for to working with him in his new capacity as general secretary of the dpj, and we will continue to work closely with the government of japan and the foreign minister across a broad range of issues between our nations. i am confident there will be high level meetings with japan coming up next week, but i will defer it to announcements that others will make on specifics of the bilaterals. >> we were just told before you got up here you would be making the announcement. >> no, no, there are some meetings the secretary will have, some that the president will have. >> can you go through the secretary's meetings as they are scheduled? >> we are relucta
school evacuation inwo days where the exp destroyed dozens of homes. >> terry mcsweeney joins us now from san bruno. nerves rattled again. >> yes. and certainly adds to the uncertainty in this neighrhood. you can see fire trucks, police, pg&e, cleanup crews. the list goes on. a lot of flashing lights. you see the america red cross over there as well. no wonder people out here are on edge. a new report may give them more reason to be that way. >> a day of school for two girls. thechool was being evacuated. no one said why. >> i talked to them and they told me there was the smell of gas. >> in the community where the school was evacuated for the same reason yesterday, people are on edge. that's why joe lynch is making sure he stays cool as possible. >> i'm just more concerned abou them not getting freaked out again because we did see the explosion and it's had quite an effect on them. i'm just trying to remain as calm as possible with them and reassure them. >> the crestmore children were evacuated to the intermediate school. he couldn believe it when he heard the announcement her schl was
! that will hurt. that same storm gave us some rain. >> meorologist veroca johnson is here with the latest. >> yeah, we needed it. we didn't get a lot though. only a few hundredths of an inch of rain. you can see on the map here, the mid-atlantic where most of the severe weather was. across new jersey, staten isnd area around new york city. also the southeast pocket of ohio there with nine tornado reports coming out o the area. now it is well south and east of the area so continuing clearing we'll have and it will be a cool night, too. still looking at some extremely dry conditions over eastern west virginia. pretty dry here. then severely dry conditns still downround culpeper, rappahanck and going over to the shenandoah valley. we need that rainfall. our radar currently is quiet. i know we've got the clouds out there but those clouds are moving out ofhere. we'll talk about the next rain chance coming up. our temperatures, nothing like yesterday. we got past 90 degrees. capitol hill at 79. trinidad, too. you folks in fairfax county, 74 degrees. a little cooler. then your warm spot is south. 82 now
college graduates by 2020. we used to be number one. we are now no. 12. we are going to get back to no. 1 by the end of the decade. that is why we're revitalizing community colleges and reforming our education system based on what works, not is -- not on what is status quo. that is why we're fighting to make permanent our new tax credit. that will mean $10 million for tuition relief for each child going to -- $10,000 for tuition relief for each child going to college. we see an america where the middle class is the bleeding heart of the economy. that is why we passed health insurance reform to stop insurance companies from jacking up your premium, then drop coverage when you are sick or have a pre-existing condition. that is why we passed financial reform, to end taxpayer bailouts. to stop on wall street banks from taking advantage of the people. we want to compete on service, on good products and good prices. that is why we are trying to make it easier for workers to pay for retirement and fighting efforts by some parties for social security, because the phone if i am president, no one i
has the impact been on the scientists now using n.i.h. funding for embryonic stem cell research in terms of the uncertainty of the future? number two, what results have been taken in a positive sense, which i know are very good for the more than $500 million already expended? and what has been the consequence of the $10 million in the stimulus package where you informally told me that it has created the tremendous excitement and a new wave of enthusiasm by researchers who had been discouraged by the failure of congress to keep the pace, which we have moved from $12 billion to $30 billion, but failure to keep the pace in funding since 2003? >> senator, thank you for the question. and let me first say how appreciative i am personally and everyone at n.i.h. is for the strong leadership you have shown over these years in your advocacy for the value of medical research, and especially because we're talking about it today for stem cell research, that has been much appreciated, and your articulation of the importance has always been right on target, as it just was here in your opening
'd the suspect, weare told by d.c. police that he is in grave condition. you can see that u.s. capitol police are still processing the scene. there were no witnesses that we heard of. nobody that police told us about. all the details ta we are getting are just from u.s. capitol pice. they aresketchy. united states capitol police are investigating a police involved shooting, blocks from the capital. u.s. police said the shooting happened moments after a lookout for a man with a weapon. >> the original lookout was with aan with a gun. whe they saw the man brandishing the gun, they acted accordly. >> reporter: police are not saying how the radio lookout for the man with a weapon originated. we don't know how many officers were involved in the shoog or how many were fired. >> the area where he was shot was second and c street, capitol grounds. it is very close. you can see the dome behind us. >> reporter: u.s. capitol police say a gun was recovered on the scene. d.c. police tell us that they have homicide detectives on standby. the suspect is in grave condition. they are here in case it does turn
is joining us live from 495. >> reporter: anybody that has ever driven along the 395 corridor during rush hour know how bad it can be. but many drivers fear with the opening of this new mark center, many people fear that rush hour conditions on 395 could get much, much worse. two hours a day worth in fact. and last night, hundreds of fairfax county residents preparedded with the officials at the department of defense to delay the opening till better transportation is in place. they say it will be intolerable conditions for drivers. and now 6400 people are set to start working at the mark center next fall. he was built nowhere near a metro station. it would force and influx much drivers on the i495 corridor, tacking on an average of two hours are to the commute. the department of defense says don't worry, we got a plan. they are going to stagger work hours and encourage workers to carpool. but there are people are saying there's no way that will work. >> this is absurd to our intelligence. i beg you to look at the idea of true mass transportation. >> reporter: that's a terrible thought. an
.r. regarding the privacy issue, he does not point out the same when does that he is concerned about us sitting 15 feet away are also visible directly out the front windows of the project site and it is a much more direct view then someone sitting on the roof. and we have a picture here, if you have questions. these are fairly small windows. from that angle, at most one would see a few feet into the window on the the best circumstances because of the steep angle, so there is no significant privacy issue and i don't think there ever will be across the street looking into windows that are also visible from other windows on that same street. therefore, we don't think there is any substantial case made for exceptional or extraordinary circumstances in this case and request the commission, and recognition of that, to decide that no further hearing is necessary and allow this project to proceed. thank you very much. president miguel: thank you. commissioner antonini? commissioner antonini: thank you. this is an example of things that can be gained through the pre application process. as was pointed o
>> as you are thinking about that, i would like to ask you to give us one more. there are 2 completely surprising and interesting substories woven through this narrative of your brother, 1, your fabulous aunt character in mexico getting frosty into mexico and running around with frita caller and your discovery of apples? >> this is astonishing, are we talking about the family past apple? >> both and the way thing danagers come together, yeah. >> kind of astonishing, again working on the idea that everything is passed down in families is it or is it not or is it coincidence. my father had a difficult relationship with his father from mexico. we knew our family had this chain of nurseries from mexico. i never understood because my father would change tg subject when his name came up. our grandfather was an orchardist at the turn of the century. >> which you hadn't even known. >> i didn't know it until i discovered this at the archive when i was trying to page through all of these things. then i discovered an obituary that had been written about our grandfather when he died whe
with what's happening in your own neighborhood. in fact, if you have a news story or tip for us, we want to hear from you, so contact us and be part of the wusa9.com team. >>> now a commuter alert for drivers who use that south capital street bridge. starting in less than two hours, d dot is closing the bridge for the entire weekend. that means all the traffic lanes will close down at 9:00 and not reopen until 5:00 a.m. on monday. now there will be more nighttime closings all the way through the end of this month. sidewalks, however, will stay open during the work. it's all part of repair and rehab on that bridge. >>> but that is not the only bridge closed, what are you talking about here? >> that's right, derek. the chain bridge less than an hour will be shut down for vehicle, bike, and foot traffic. it will stay that way throughout the weekend. so you have outdoor plans, you will be out of luck. it will reopen 8:00 monday morning. now talking about late traffic this evening, it is still happening on the west side of town to the temple below speed all the way and the pace picks up towa
the fire. how many people have used a fire extinguisher before. >> may be 10 percent of you. by the end of the week you will be putting out a fire with a fire extinguisher. you don't want to learn out to house an extinguisher when they big fire is in front of you. when you turn off your natural gas and water. hazardous materials will be talked about next week. 35-40 percent of you. you will find out that all of you have hazardous material in your home. the third week is disaster medicine. you, going into a room spending 45 seconds on one person into 3 life saving techniques. by the fourth we we will teach you as search and rescuers how to keep yourself safe by identifying safe and none safe building to go into. sometimes objects are too heavy for you to liftoff of a body. we will teach you privying which will use anything you have, wood or cement blocks so you is see that people can lift heavy objects off of people. now, you have to have a plan. every program needs to have a plan. we can't say, here are your skills. class 6, after half an hour we will split you into teams of 10 people
, retail meters, as well, using these same meters. you would not have to install others. and we're using the local work force to do this. first, the need to transition units, which is this little grey box. when it comes to your home near you, this will be screwed to the underside of the meter box cover, and the meter just sits where it always does with the pipe itself. and then transmits the data to will be called data collection units, of which there are 77 that are scattered around the city so far. they collect material and then transport it to the networking computer that then deals with the data. the meter transition units, again, they take our lead readings, and the technology has not changed. i want to keep emphasizing that. this is technology from decades of use. these are no some -- not some newfangled type of thing. the box transmits the data at 4 bits per day, so it is not a constant stream of data. it is just four times per day. it can be shut off remotely. they're pretty well protected so they cannot be tampered with without physically going to remove the box, and, that means
important mark on the marsh with their work on trying to move us in a wonderful and positive direction. >> reporter: they were killed last week when a gas line exploded and fire brought down their house in san bruno. 13-year-old janessa was in the eighth grade, president of the student body, piano player, dancer and actress in school plays. >> she was just larger than life and she has such a -- such an amazing gift for living that when you -- as soon as you met her, you smiled because that's what she brought out in you. >> reporter: many of the people who attended were her classmates. school was cancelled for the day. >> she was really funny and made us all laugh when she smiled. >> she got her characteristics from her mom. her mom was intelligent, poised, she had a lot of class. >> reporter: jackie worked at the california public utilities commission for more than 20 years and even served on a committee focused on natural gas, but her main job was mother. >> the world should know how special the mother-daughter relationship is. >> reporter: at a memorial service last night, a tape of
>> good afternoon. thank you so much for joining us today on this notable moment in the kempton family's life. i'm doug price, the general manager of the sir francis drake hotel. i'd like to introduce you to our chief executive officer, mike tabati. [applause] >> thank you, john. welcome, everybody, it's great to be here today. the mayor is apparently on his way. will make a grand entrance in just a moment. i want to thank everybody for coming. as many of you know, kempton has a very long history as a leader and a pioneer in the hospitality industry for our earth care program and practices. really started back years ago when bill kempton in his first hotel here in san francisco nearly 30 years ago. and since that time over the last 30 years, we've been able to add a lot of hotels to our system. we now have 10 hotels here in san francisco. actually one in coopertino. 54 fine dining restaurants. during that time, since our first hotel, we've been amassing high-impact, non-intrusive, eco-friendly operational business practices, to reduce energy and waste consumption in our hotels,
. the allegation that i use the tab without a permit is hogwash. i regularly used the not-in- service tab as my personal transportation vehicle. >> thank you. commissioner fung:, shoulder do you have? -- how much longer do you have? >> 30 seconds. her statement made it look like both camps were being used at the same time. and never once stopped to pick up a fair when i was on an errand run and put visible signs in each rear window of the tab that said "not in service" when i was using it to run errands. i hope i have explained why some things were not previously available. i will answer any questions you might have. my intent was never to disobey rules and laws -- exactly the opposite. i believed i was obey federal labor laws to give my workers the option since it was 100% employee contributory. commissioner fung: one more sentence. >> a revocation or suspension of my permit is grossly unreasonable and the decision should be set aside in its entirety. over 1000 hours of my time and $30,000 of attorneys fees is enough for and an intentional wrongdoing. -- anm unintentional wrongdoing. >> mr. mu
they are about helping all of us find answers who are pained and suffering. if we keep dragging this debate back here to washington, in congress and in the courts, more and more scientists will either find a different research avenue or move to another country where they can pursue the promise that embryonic stem cells possess. once and for all i urge congress to pass unambiguous legislation that allows this research to move forward. i grew up around racetracks and my family has won the indianapolis 500 a total of nine times. the goal of every driver is to pass under the black and white checkered flag first. the meaning of the checkered flag is winning. right now i can see the flag waving for me to go by, but with this current court ruling i feel that i have been driving under a long yellow caution flag. today i came here to say that this research is real, promising and hopeful to me and to others as we want so much to take that checkered flag and win our battles over diseases that constantly challenge our quality of life. thank you very much. >> thank you, ms. unser. we now have two more votes.
exporters an unfair advantage and doesn't help the u.s. economic recovery. but geithner said he was not prepared to label china a "currency manipulator" under u.s. law. >> tom: that reluctance was all too familiar to members of congress, and they grilled geithner with hostile questions. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: even the senators grilling the treasury secretary today admit hearings on china's overvalued currency have become something of a ritual over the years. it begins with the expression of outrage from senators like new york's charles schumer. >> at a time when the u.s. economy is trying to pick itself up off the ground, china's currency manipulation is like a boot to the throat of our recovery. and this administration refuses to try to take that boot off our neck. >> reporter: then, it's the treasury secretary's turn to share concern, to offer tougher rhetoric, and then to explain that declaring china a currency manipulator under the current law will do little more than require more consultations, as treasury secretary geithner explained today. >> wishing something
hit very hard by the storm, as you know this is not a part of the world where they're used to tornadoes which has so many scratching their heads tonight. >> oh, my god. this is crazy. >> reporter: in a metropolitan area, saturated with smartphone captured from so many angles including these pictures which window. >> am i really in jersey? >> reporter: this storm which brought high winds and lightning strikes did an enormous amount of damage in only about 15 minutes. shutting down the nation's largest commuter rail line, delaying more than 300 flights and knocking down more than a thousand trees. one woman was killed when a tree fell on her parked car right after she traded seats with her husband who survived. >> i keep thinking about is this happens. >> reporter: it spawned tornadoes and softball-size hail by thursday before barreling extreme weather all over the planet. in the u.s. it's been the hottest year ever with major atlantic hurricanes showing up further to the east and to the climate scientists have long predicted as the climate warms extreme weather although the
his mother's care. that's where gary nurenberg picks up the story and joins us live. >> reporter: this has become a sea of disbelief how neighbors wonder why a man so clearly close to his mother took his life. >> i can't believe it. >> reporter: she lives next to. he used the mother's last name at time and was known as warren davis. >> he was always there for her. if she had to go in an ambulance or anything, he rode with her. he never left her side. and i told her when she was walking out, she had a great son. this is just hard to believe. it's really hard. >> reporter: neighbors say he kept to himself but saw him now and then at church services just up the street. in her illness, he tried to give his mother a good quality of life. >> he had called about two months ago and wanted to know if i knew an address that would come because she wasn't able to come out but he wanted somebody to come to the house. so that was the kind of person he was. he didn't seem to know a lot of the neighbors. but he didn't bother anybody and he worked every day and just seemed like a decent person w
the dmv. law enforcement tells cbs 5, the pair used addresses in the application process that put their legal residences inside the fire zone. >> it was to obtain identification that was not their identification and it was in an effort to get identification for somebody else who did live within the site. our belief was it was in an effort to be able to then go and make an application to get some of the funds that are being provided to victims of the event. >> reporter: five felony charges have been filed. they are commercial burglary, perjury, felony filing of a false document, identity theft, and welfare fraud. when smith and justin applied for the licenses, they caught the eye of dmv investigators, who then alerted san bruno police. at a press conference today, county law enforcement agencies were clear about what would happen to anyone trying to run a scam in the fire zone. >> we view them as vermin. and we are going to prosecute them to the fullest extent of the law, meaning we're going to charge them with everything we can charge them with. we are not going to plea bargain wi
. for us, we are at the status quo. we have a month left. we're working hard to get our folks ready for the transition. we hope to not have to do that, but we are preparing for pretty bad news. today, final push. the mayor will talk a little bit about the program as well. >> thanks, and thank you all very much for taking the time to be here. i actually just left senator feinstein, who has been a champion of this program. the reference that not to impress but to impress upon you that we need all the friends we can get all the champions we can get to extend this program. 3820 families are being served by this program. these are families, many of which -- close to, in fact, 1000 of these families were on welfare, and now pulled out of welfare and have the dignity of a paycheck and the dignity that comes with a paycheck. when they come back home to feed their family. that is not a rhetorical line. that is not a line just to place some politics. that is quite literal. this program, arguably, is the most successful stimulus program in the united states of america, and i can back that up.
'donnell is also one of the speakers. >> the small elite do not get as. because what he. they call us we noing nuts. -- they call us wacky. >> sarah palin was not at the event. she was making an appearance in iowa. >>> president obama named elizabeth warren as a special white house assistant to oversee the new consumer protection bureau. the agency's goal will be to crack down on deceptive practices by companies that issue credit cards, mortgages, and other financial products. the naming has been controversial. some critics say that she was not nominated as the bureau's director. to avoid a potentially lengthy that was -- that was done to avoid a potentially lengthy confirmation fight. >>> new developments in the family's civil lawsuit of that murder. who refuses to testify? >>> a big winner in a different primary. mayor fenty is reacting to that victory. >>> the world's biggest airline -- a major step forward. said the change i'm here in the belfort furniture weather center to the final weekend of summer is upon us. i have that and more coming up. [ man ] then try this. new and improved freestyle
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